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We ordered a $4 serving. The plate of char kway teow was definitely less oily than usual, and was fried with bean sprouts, cockles, eggs and chye poh (preserved radish), and topped with blanched and still-crunchy Chye Sim (Vegetable).There was taste of charred flavour in the kway teow, the eggs, chai poh (preserved radish), and the cockles helped to enhance the taste. The blanket of green vegetable (chye sim) completely buried the kway teow and one could mistake the kway teow as a fried vegetabl
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We ordered a $4 serving. The plate of char kway teow was definitely less oily than usual, and was fried with bean sprouts, cockles, eggs and chye poh (preserved radish), and topped with blanched and still-crunchy Chye Sim (Vegetable).There was taste of charred flavour in the kway teow, the eggs, chai poh (preserved radish), and the cockles helped to enhance the taste. The blanket of green vegetable (chye sim) completely buried the kway teow and one could mistake the kway teow as a fried vegetable dish. This is the most distinct trademark of Huat Heng Fried Kway Teow and the selling point of the dish; (perhaps they should call it a vegetable fried kway teow instead?)
Overall, if you are health-conscious but crave for fried kway teow, eating at Heng Huat will certainly soothe your conscience and make you feel less guilty about it. It’s definitely good enough to satisfy those cravings. However, if given a choice, we would definitely still go for the version fried with lard.
Please refer to www.ieatandeat.com for details review.
Fried Kway Teo
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(The above review is the personal opinion of a user which does not represent OpenRice's point of view.)
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Dining Method
Dine In
Recommended Dishes
Fried Kway Teo