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dairycream
This is dairycream . French, European, Japanese are my favorite cuisines. I also love Bakery, Hotel, Restaurant and Salads, Pasta, Desserts and Cakes, Cakes.
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Categories : Japanese

 
To say the food here is AMAZING is an
understatement. For full review, visit : http://dairycream.blogspot.sg

My (and even my family) favorite Japanese
restaurant in Singapore has launched their FIRST Kyoto fair featuring the
award-winning KYOTO BEEF that has done its ancestors proud by clinching the TOP
prize at the 61st Kinki Tokai Hokuriku Union Beef Cattle Kyoshin Association in
2014.

Really? Kyoto Beef? How good can it be when
it's not even one of the Top 3 Wagyu Beef in Japan? Yes, I had those questions
in mind too but when I had a bite of the Kyoto Beef, I nearly wanted to flip
the tables. (Just kidding) Trust me, this breed of cow is just as elite as the
vegetables and tofu produce from Kyoto.

Wagyu purists might disagree but I do
not care. This is definitely my ideal cattle because of the regular marbling of
fats make this a balanced cut that is tender yet not too fatty. Kobe beef felt
like swallowing a whole chunk of butter and I couldn't proceed after one. But
not for this.

 
The one-week Kyoto fair is run by Okamoto
san, an experienced chef with a restaurant in Kyoto. ALL ingredients, from the
pickles in the appetizers to the strawberries in dessert are all imported from
Kyoto.

There is ala carte menu but the
lunch/dinner course is much more highly recommended for the full quality
experience. The price ranges from $28 to $100, which is jaw-droppingly
reasonable for the excellent standards of the meal. Here is the recap of what
the meal:

 
5 kinds of Obanzai appetizers--Spinach with
Tofu, Carrot Kakiage, Pickled Pink Ginger, Burdock Roots, Raw Tofu

 
Fresh Kyo-Yuba with Uni

 
Main Course for the Gion Set ($28) Kyoto
Beef in Kyoto Negi (Leeks) and Tofu Pot This tasted like a very robust
sukiyaki but yet sweet! I could pour the broth over a bowl of rice and just
finish everything.

 
Main Course for Miyabi Set ($58) Stone
Grilled Kyoto Beef A5 Tenderloin

For dinner, the course (2 options $78/$100)
is more extravagant and it comes with the following additional items:

 
Fresh Gluten Cake with Miso

 
Sashimi Mix (Chutoro 2pcs, Tai 2pcs,
Hamachi 1 pc)

 
Main Course - Kyoto Beef A5 Kyoto Soy Milk
Shabu Shabu (or the above Stone Grilled A5 Tenderloin shown in Lunch Miyabi
Set)

 
Fresh Kyo-Yuba and Kinoko Ankake with Rice きのこと湯葉のあんかけ御飯 (Only for Dinner Miyabi
$100)
Everyone, even my non-rice lover friend, was swooning for this Japanese
"Mui fan". Every set comes with rice, miso soup, Kyoto
Tsukemono (pickles) and dessert

 
But that's not the end. The dessert brought
the Kyoto meal to another climax. Matcha Fondue. Yes, dark green liquid served
WARM with Kyoto Strawberries, Warabi Mochi, Matcha Cake and Shiratama Dango.
This was so ridiculously good that I licked my fondue cup clean.
Blissful.

 
The beef, the tofu, the matcha. Every ingredient
played their respective role in he course. Looks like this meal has set a high
standard for 2015 and honestly speaking, it's difficult to find another place
in Singapore that can beat this in terms of value and quality.
For full review, visit : http://dairycream.blogspot.sg

 
Spending per head: Approximately $80(Dinner)

Other Ratings:
Taste
 5  |  
Environment
 3  |  
Service
 2  |  
Clean
 3  |  
Price
 4

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Categories : Thai

 
Full story on http://dairycream.blogspot.sg/2015/01/thai-in-town-thai-wanton-mee-more.html
Another Thai Wanton Mee? Yes, it seems like Thai Wanton Mee has become more popular these days. After Soi 19 and BaaMee, Thai in Town is my 3rd stop for Thai Wanton Mee and the good thing is that they sell more than just the noodles. In fact, it is a very new casual all-day eatery establishment along Upp Thomson Road that sells the usual Thai cuisine.

At $6.90, the Wanton Mee is one of the most beautifully plated version yet it is also the driest one. Technically, the flavours of Thai Wanton Mee tend to be less plain than our local style so I was prepared to toss them with the fish sauce and chilli for that nice kick.

 
don't go without trying the chilli--dry chilli flakes and the sour chilli dressing (free flow at the side)

Yet, the noodles posed as a major hurdle as they clumped together in a bad shape, barely inseparable from one another. Both the wanton skin and meat were also stiffened, though the smooth slices of char siew were given more meticulous treatment than those from Soi 19 and Baa Mee.

 
Instead of the lackluster wanton Mee, I would highly recommend the Claypot Prawn Tanghoon ($14.90). The Tanghoon are throughly infused with the flavour of the prawn stock and was sufficiently peppery to the degree of not over-killing the taste buds. They were generous with the prawns, peeled garlic cloves and not to mention, the ginger that added some interest.

But the best thing about this dish is how well it complemented with the sour Chilli condiments at the side of the table. The portion is enough to serve as a staple for two pax, if you are ordering other sides.

 
The Tom Yam Chicken Fried Rice ($6.90) was delicious too. Tossed with red chilli and shallots, this was adequately moist and only mildly spicy.

 
The Tom Yam Soup ($12.90) is robustly punchy and well-penetrated with the flavours of galangal and kafir lime. However, the Folks found the fish not very fresh and preferred the clear soup version to this coconut-milk based one.

 
Tom Yum Soup

 
Served with peanuts and sugar at the side was this plate of seafood Pad Thai ($7.90) that was moist and fragrant with bits of scrambled eggs. I enjoyed the sweet and sour flavors but the clumpy, over-chewy noodles mired what could be a satisfactory experience.

 
I only got to the Gai Tod ($5.90/4 pcs) at the very end but the golden exterior remained light and crisp. Instead of dipping sauce, they were served with crunchy mixed spices--a rare sight for chicken wings in Singapore--that perfumed the meat with a tantalizing aroma. I think this plate would easily make chicken wing lovers swoon for more.

There are Red Ruby and Mango Sticky Rice under the desserts option but we headed straight for the Chocolate Toast with Ice Cream ($10.90).

 
This was much bigger than the one from Xin Wang and would already make one full meal alone. It was clever for them to serve two scoops of chocolate chip ice cream because one would be too little. The bread itself is already very enticing because the outer wall yielded delicately crunchy bites while the inner walls are painted with butter that exudes an subtle savory allure.

 
I was itching to try out the BBQ bread with Thai Tea Sauce ($2.20) since the toast earlier was so yummy. They also serve steam breads in dim sum baskets with various dips like kaya, chocolate, condensed milk and sugar. However, the Thai Tea Sauce was rather elusive and the layer of butter spread easily dominated the flavours.

 
The food here is overall quite good, except for the Wanton mee and Pad Thai which have potential to shine on the tables. Good to know that there is NO service charge and GST

 
Spending per head: Approximately $20(Dinner)

Other Ratings:
Taste
 3  |  
Environment
 2  |  
Service
 2  |  
Clean
 2  |  
Price
 3

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Expensive Bites OK Feb 04, 2015   
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Categories : American | Fusion | Bars/Lounges | Restaurant

 
Full review : www.dairycream.blogspot.com

Tapas being tapas, portions are small and meant as light bites that go with beer. But I wondered if it was a coincidence that most of them were quite greasy.

 
Breaded lightly with Panko crumbs, the highly-raved Portobello Truffle Chips ($16++) arrived with fragrant truffle aroma that soon dissipates into cold air. There was no trace of salt or herbs, hence the first few bites without the roasted garlic alioli oozed out bland oily juices that the giant mushroom has soaked up in the frying process.

 
The Sweet Baby Back ($20++) also faced similar issues as the cuts were soft but contained too much fats that it was difficult to tear off much meat from the bone. It was not surprisingly that the grease left us jaded with mild discomfort in the throat. However, the blend of sweet paprika in the marinade resulted in some sweet pleasant taste without the heat.

 
We prefer the Chilean Seabass ($24++) which has a lovely depth of umami flavour coming from the miso and wine marinade. The Soy Yuzu Beef ($20++) is another meaty joy to savour with bright acidic notes. Torched lightly on the surface, the thinly-sliced Argentine tenderloin, albeit raw and pinkish on the underneath, were delectably succulent and chewy.

 

 
The Matcha Millefeuille ($15++) was a huge mishap, possibly one of the least palatable restaurant dessert I've ever encountered. Despite being assembled ala minute, the puff pastry was soggy (underbaked in the first place). The substandard matcha cream and some foreign objects like lychees failed to translate well on the palates.

I sneaked a peek at the white chocolate banana tempura which the French guy next to us ordered and was glad we didn't order that. Phew.

 
Nonetheless, there was one very delicious dessert that melted our hearts--the Peanut butter molten lava cake ($15++). Baked in a iron-cast mini stove pan, the crusty dark chocolate exterior comes with a rich saucy peanut butter center, so rich that we could forgive the puny amount of ice cream served alongside. So skip the other 2 desserts and order this. However, dining at East8 chalked up a hefty despite the "savings" and it is a good place to chill-out but not for a quality meal that would fill you up. Full review : www.dairycream.blogspot.com

 
Spending per head: Approximately $48(Dinner)

Other Ratings:
Taste
 2  |  
Environment
 2  |  
Service
 2  |  
Clean
 2  |  
Price
 1

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Categories : Japanese | Bakery | Café | Brunch

 
Full review: http://dairycream.blogspot.sg/2015/01/asanoya-singapore.html
Something that bewildered me is the sheer popularity of the Cube Loaf--cream filled
cube-shaped bread available in Yuzu cheese, Caramel apple, Matcha, Chocolate,
etc. Perhaps due to our nation's fetish for something goeey or flowy in the
centre (think Liu sha bao or molten lava cake), this has been the most featured
item on any media platform.

 
However, I suggest we try to manage our
expectations as the Matcha is just a chewy chocolate bread filled with sweet
matcha custard that is resistant to flow. Perhaps the chef did not intend to make
it flow in the first place. The problem wasn't whether it flowed or not, but
that the cream was too sugary, to the extent that it overpowered the demure tea
taste. At a hefty tag of $4.50, I'm hesitant to invest in another one.

 
The
Cinnamon Danish ($3.20) called out to me with that attractive dark brown sheen
but it was more chewy than crunchy, as the sticky caramel goo clung on
stubbornly to the knife .....and my cavities the more I chow on it.

 
Though
the Sweet Potato Yuzu Cream Danish is constructed on the similar danish base,
the main ingredients helped to distract us away from the mediocrity. Yuzu is not
only visibly detected as peels on top but also in the white cream base, which
imparted a lovely tanginess that complemented the warm sweet potatoes. I was
glad we stood by this "less-popular" option instead of the
all-too-common blueberry custard danish.

 
The
other autumn-inspired bread named "Harvest" ($4.50) was also
excellent. The texture of the bread is chewier than an average European
baguette but the subtle honey flavour crawled out as one slowly bite into it.
The earthy sweetness from the candied sweet potatoes, chestnuts rode upon the
savoury cream cheese to create another wonderful dimension in this humble stick
that is easily overlooked on the shelf.

 
The
feathery soft innards with mild buttery notes in the Plain Brioche ($2.60) made
this quite enjoyable but my partners felt that it lacked the richness from egg
and butter. Despite the sexy cheesy strands effect that took place as we plucked
the Tomato Mozzarella ($2.60) apart, this pizza dough fared the worse because
it left a pool of grease on our lips and hands instead of the double umami
sensation on our tongues.

 
I
love the Signature Curry Bun, which tasted like any orthodox non-spicy Japanese
curry bun with the mellow sweetness. We were lucky to get one from the batch
that was hot out from the deep fryer so it was crunchy and not too oily.

 
The
Mushroom Quiche ($6) is indeed a very straightforward quiche with plenty of
mushrooms. While there could be more salt in this, there was enough that it
registered for me. This was good but the Potato French was even better.

 
At
$3.20, one get an entire potato with skin intact, snugged tightly within the
crusty French bread under the luscious blanket of butter and mayonnaise. Have
it warmed up and one would be greeted by mini billows of steam from the soft
potato. Genius.

 
Despite
the liberal amount of icing, I was not assaulted by a blast of sweetness in the
Caramel Apple Croissant ($3.90). The tartness of the soft-but-not-mushy apples
cut through the dense almond paste. Also, the flaky pastry here managed to
salvage my impression of their weak Danish dough.

 
The signature Karuizawa Green Tea Loaf is sold here in grams at $2.60/100g, which
is about the weight of one slice. Blended with white chocolate, the bread has a
tinge of milky sweetness, which was slightly different from the taste when I
had it in Japan. Nonetheless, the texture is still spot-on; soft stretchy with
a crusty brown shield. Would be great if they can also introduce the Coffee
loaf in future.

Overall,the savory items were more remarkable than the sweet items, even though the price
across all items was not very pocket-friendly. I was quite disappointed by the
sweet bread but maybe to think on a positive note, the cube loafs are something
exclusive to Singapore market. Nonetheless, there is still room for improvement
before both the quality of the food and the service standards here can match up
truly with the level in Japan.

Full review: http://dairycream.blogspot.sg/2015/01/asanoya-singapore.html

 
 
Spending per head: Approximately $15(Tea)

Other Ratings:
Taste
 3  |  
Environment
 2  |  
Service
 2  |  
Clean
 2  |  
Price
 2

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Spicy Thai-Thai Cafe @ Aljunied Smile Jan 29, 2015   
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Categories : Thai | Coffeeshop | Steamboat/Hot Pot

 
If you think that Thai cuisine is all about Tom Yam Soup, Phad Thai or Pineapple Rice, then it's time to make a trip to Spicy Thai Thai Cafe, a casual Thai style eatery in the Aljunied heartlands that serves North-Eastern Thai cuisine with some Teochew flair.
Full review visit : http://dairycream.blogspot.sg/2015/01/spicy-thai-thai-cafe.html

 
The Claypot Lala Beehoon ($18) justified a visit on its own, with the succulent fresh clams, chillies and moist beehoon that soaked up the peppery broth. The addictive, vibrant flavors immediately sparked an enthusiastic response across the table that borders on mania.

 
The Fried Lad Na, thai style deep fried hor fun, paled in comparison as the stock was slightly diluted and lacked much aromatic character. Nonetheless, the chef's deft hand in seafood is also evident in the Basil Mussels ($15), submerged in a funky, umami-laden broth enhanced with aromatic cilantro and Thai Chilli.

 
More delicate tongues can rest eat with the BBQ Pork Collar, slices of beautifully burnished meat with a distinctive caramelized aroma. The Chicken Wings $6 for 4pcs were slicked in a delectably sticky and sweet coating but the meat was too dry.

 
Some of the cuisine here reminded me of comfort home-cooked dishes that go superbly with a bowl of rice. The Dill Pat Omelette ($8) is a well executed puffy "chye poh neng" that comes without the radish but a special legume called cha om (or English Cattle) that is grown in Thailand. For a unique twist, try the Water Fry egg, a pool of tasty and tender scrambled eggs studded with occasion chopped chillis, spring onions and served with Thai Style Crispy Sun dried fish ($12), which disguised sneakily as the brown conch-like decoration at the corner. Other tasty gear on offer includes the fish cakes and prawn cakes ($2 each)

 
Looking like the tempura vegetables, the Deep Fried Kangkong ($10) would probably be a great snack to go with beer or simply with the special thai sauce--a nutty, mildly spiced concoction with mixed with minced pork. These were not too greasy but I prefer still prefer stir-fry vegetables because the greens were zapped of its original taste after a dip in the high-temperature oil.

 
The real treat here is THE FISH. To ensure that the spicy, complex lemon broth stays piping hot till you even finish your desserts, the owner goes the extra mile to serve the Thai Walking Cat Fish ($28) on charcoal , an authentic way of maintaining the heat and quality. With fresh meat of melting texture, this dish kills two birds with one stone as one can skip the Tom Yam Soup and slurp down the hellaciously hot soup to the very last drop.

 
Something a little more extravagant would be the Red Emperor Fish Snapper (seasonal price) that is steamed and sprinkled with garlic, chilli's and slices of lime. This second fish of the night is as much an achievement as the previous catfish, or perhaps even better as the flavours are sharp and seasoning is bang on.

 
Other desserts include Thai Red Ruby ($3.50) Lemon Grass Jelly with Aloe Vera Cubes and Calamansi ($2.50)
The desserts were those usual suspects that one would rattle off from a typical Thai menu but they were above pedestrian quality. My favourite was the Tapioca in Coconut Milk ($3.50) . These starchy roots were as soft as sweet potatoes and the warm temperature of coconut milk heightened the natural sweetness--a welcome change from the usual cold, stodgy version. The Sticky Glutinous Rice with Mango ($6) took me by surprise too, with the rice yielded a perfect texture.

Given such an extensive menu of more than 50 items, I am really impressed that the chef can manage to maintain such a stellar quality across most of the dishes here. Though I did not manage to try my favourite Tom Yum Soup or Papaya Salad this time round, I was very satisfied with the robustness of the herbs and spices here. With a constantly changing menu and very reasonable prices, this is definitely another great place for Thai food
Full review visit : http://dairycream.blogspot.sg/2015/01/spicy-thai-thai-cafe.html
 
Dining Offers: 試食活動


Other Ratings:
Taste
 4  |  
Environment
 3  |  
Service
 3  |  
Clean
 3  |  
Price
 4

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