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mycc
This is mycc living in Central. I work in Central. I like to hang out in Chinatown, Raffles Place, Orchard. Japanese, Singaporean, International are my favorite cuisines. I also love Hawker Centre, Bakery and Roasted Meat, Desserts and Cakes, Dim Sum.
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Categories : Ice Cream and Gelato

Tucked quietly at an inconspicuous corner at East Coast Road, this was definitely a rare gem spotted. The owners of the ice cream parlour were friendly and took special efforts to strike up conversation with each and every customer, be it a walk-in like us or the regular patrons. The casual setting of the ice cream place with stools fit for adults and kids alike is surely a must-try spot if you are along the Katong eating district.

Chendol | S$6.50/-

 

Always a fan of our Singapore desserts such as chendol and ice kachang, this almost became a must-try when I spotted it on the menu. The salted gula melaka ice cream was extremely rich and bold in flavours and certainly won my palate over. Paired with the usual sweet red beans, pandan jelly and attap seeds, it was almost reinventing the usual chendol enjoyed at a hawker stall onto this innocent looking plastic cup.
Red Ruby | S$6.50/-

 
One of the newer creations that was added onto the menu, the Red Ruby is a familiar dessert for most but under the influence of the liquid nitrogen, the dessert was reinvented, almost. With flesh scraped from the young coconut, the sweet coconut water was used in the making of the coconut ice cream. The addition of coconut milk enriched the flavours and made it a lot more robust. The icing for me was the diced water chestnut coated in a thin jelly that added crunch to each mouthful. Yes, it was definitely on the sweeter side but isn't that the whole point of having a dessert, to cure our sweet tooth craving?

 
While we still crave for the lovely scoops down at Chin Chin Lab in London, I think we found our next best in Singapore, for now.

Full review is available at http://www.makeyourcaloriescount.com/2015/06/sg-ice-queen-ice-cream-creations-with.html
 
Table Wait Time: 0 minute(s)


Spending per head: Approximately $6.50(Supper)

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 4  |  
Price
 4

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Categories : French | Italian | European | Japanese | Seafood | Sushi/Sashimi | Fine Dining

Quietly tucked on the rooftop garden of Orchard Central, Joie (pronounced 'Joy') has an interesting concept of specialising in meatless cuisine. When I first heard meatless, I instantaneously thought of vegetarian or even vegan only to realise that is not the case as the restaurant uses dairy products in some of its dishes, especially the desserts.
The meatless dining trend is in fact a lot more popular and prevalent in Europe and Taiwan, which focuses on natural fare prepared with the freshest vegetables, fruits and herbs. Offering a choice of a six-course lunch (S$38.80/++) or the seven-course dinner (S$68.80/++), one can expect contemporary dishes with a Japanese-European touch. Can Executive Chef Sherwin Sim impress us and (make us full) with his meatless cuisine?

Divine | Amuse Bouche

 

 

 
With the amuse bouche served at the chef's selection, we had the sesame soya milk sphere, carrot konnyaku and an interesting pistachio charcoal crumb. The sesame soya milk was delicately wrapped within, by an almost film-like thin bubble that burst with flavours and richness as I popped it into my mouth! In particular, the carrot konnyaku had a lovely rubbery and jelly-like texture. Lastly, the pistachio crumb tasted rather bland though I enjoyed the coarseness of the crumb which contrasted the other two elements served.

Prelude | Mushroom Gratin

 

 
The button mushrooms gratin was served with Tennessee heirloom potato puree and Belgian endive. This dish fondly reminded me of the classic escargot dish generously covered with a rich layer of cheese and tucking in made me realised that button mushrooms made a perfect substitution!

Prelude | Matsutake Cake

 
The steamed Japanese mushroom cake with rosemary gelee, golden enoki, vanilla creme and pistachio crumbs did not quite suit my palate. While the firm texture of the mushroom cake and the pistachio crumbs were good elements on the dish, the overall taste came across rather flat and bland.

Awakening | Spring Vegetable Terrine

 
Quite frankly, I was never a fan of terrine though my last experience at Le Bistrot Du Sommelier was really memorable. While the firm but jelly-like texture of the terrine was palatable, I found the taste to be quite an acquired rendition led by aubergines, carrots, mushrooms and peppers drizzled with pistachio soil crumbs and a garlic-onion emulsion for an added punch of flavours.

Awakening | Cubes of Duo Watermelon

 
I found this to be a much more refreshing choice for my second course. The red and yellow watermelon cubes with feta cheese, mint gelee had its flavours elevated by the refreshing burst of pomegranate seeds before the balsamic reduction harmoniously wraps up the dish.

Elixir | Snow Pear with Napa Cabbage Consomme

 

 
I loved how the dish was presented where we have to pour the double-boiled rich vegetable broth into the cup containing almond flakes and poached baby pear. The subtle yet flavoursome broth was everything you would ask for in a bowl of comfort soup, which fondly reminded me of my mum's cooking!

Crescendo | Wild Rice

 
The sauteed wild rice was served with baby radish, baby carrot and haricot verts. Each mouthful was a complex blend of textures and flavours as the added pine nuts also added a dimension of crunch. The dish tasted raw and clean, which perhaps explains the inspiration and name of the dish! If you are expecting soft or al dente texture for your rice, this would probably not suit your palate as this was slightly on the hard side.

Crescendo | Baby Garden Root Vegetables

 
Beautifully decorated, golden baby beetroot with baby carrots, root vegetables, black truffle flakes and truffle mash, horseradish butter garlic sauce was almost an art piece to marvel. With plenty of ingredients and elements on the dish, it was the horseradish butter garlic sauce which took centerstage with its rich and dominating flavours. Not forgetting the soft carrots and golden and purple baby beetroots air-flown from Holland where the chef prepared via sous-vide provided the sweet touches to impress.

Crescendo | Trio of Spheres

 

 

 
Taking a closer look, you would notice that the chef took extra effort to use edible gold paint to draw a picture involving the trio of spheres which included a fresh wild mushroom with truffle oil and onion in puff pastry, butternut pumpkin risotto ball with curry mayonnaise and crispy duo of mozzarella arancini.
The curry mayonnaise took me by surprise as the bold flavours hit me instantly, in a pleasant way though. You cannot quite go wrong with these delicious golden-brown trios!
Sweet Endings | Chef's Dessert Platter

 

 

 
Everyone was in awe when the gueridon trolley was pushed into our private dining room. We had the privilege of choosing from an assortment of desserts ranging from macaroons, chocolates, cookies to candies! Choosing a fair mix of items, we thought that the desserts rightfully provided us with a sweet ending!
Paired with the desserts is a choice of a drink where one can choose from a range of teas, coffee and mocktails!

Iced Mallow Apple Melody

 
An invigorating blend of mallow flowers, apple and guava juice, it was indeed a refreshing drink to cleanse our palate!

 

 

 
Overall, I love the creativity of the chef and more importantly his efforts in instilling aesthetics into his dishes. Not only did he glorify the natural ingredients comprising mainly the greens, we almost forgot that it was a meatless cuisine even till the end. With six courses, it was certainly more than enough to keep the gents filled not to mention the ladies!
Located on the 12th floor with a rooftop garden, the outdoor seating would definitely be a lovely chill out spot in the evenings!

For the full review, please refer to http://www.makeyourcaloriescount.com/2014/11/sg-joie-by-dozo-can-meatless-cuisine.html

 
Dining Offers: 試食活動


Other Ratings:
Taste
 4  |  
Environment
 4  |  
Service
 4  |  
Clean
 4  |  
Price
 4

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Categories : Japanese | Seafood | Sushi/Sashimi

While most would be familiar with the stretch of Japanese restaurants along Mohamed Sultan Road, it would be worth paying attention to this inconspicuously located restaurant, Fuku Fine Fugu Kaiseki, which is the first restaurant in Asia outside Japan to serve the exquisite puffer fish all year round!
Before you wonder if you misread that statement, you did not. Most people, myself included, would assume that puffer fish (also known as fugu in Japanese) is poisonous but what many did not realise is that with more than 100 species of fugu out there, there are only 20 species that are edible. Of which, Fuku imports the most prized Tora Fugu (Tiger Puffer Fish) both wild and farmed, twice a week by air from Shiminoseki (the specialty area of fugu).

Under Japanese law, all chefs have to be specially licensed by the government before they can prepare and serve fugu to guests as the fish can be potentially fatal if prepared wrongly. Diners at Fuku can be assured of their safety as all of the air flown fish have to be removed of their internal organs, cleaned and meet the strict regulations by Japanese authorities before they are approved for import into Singapore.
What we learnt also was that there are in fact farmed varieties that are bred without the poisonous organs!
At Fuku, the chefs prepare the prized fish kaiseki style, which is a traditional multi-course Japanese dinner. It typically refers to a set menu of selected food served on an individual tray to each member at the table or gathering.
Starting from S$150++/person for a six-course meal to S$580++/person for a nine-course wild fugu set which requires a 5-day advance booking, each set promises to impress your dining guests and companions.

Yubiki

 
A popular appetiser for a fugu meal, the skin of the fish is parboiled to become a gelatinous texture similar to cartilage before being served in ponzu sauce, spicy radish and finely chopped chives to enhance the light flavours. For the ladies who crave for their collagen boost, this would be a dish to load up!

Tessa

 
An absolutely gorgeous platter of fugu sashimi was served and you could not help but admire the fine slicing skills of the chef. If not prepared right, it would result in instantaneous death hence this was once regarded as gun-powder.
Interestingly, the paper-thin shavings or usuzukuri ends with a sloping thicker end for an elegant presentation as above where the translucent and intricate arrangements flaunt the exquisiteness of fugu. On its own, the sashimi tasted quite bland though it has an unique elastic texture to its flesh.

 
We were advised to consume it together with specially imported Japanese baby leeks, ponzu sauce with spicy radish and shoyu sauce with wasabi which collectively instilled flavours to the fish. What I enjoyed in particular was the finely grated radish which we recently learnt about its health benefits during our visit to Tonkatsu by Ma Maison. At Fuku, the otherwise standard grated radish was treated with special care as it was allowed to rest with chilli oil, absorbing the heat to impart flavours to the fugu when consumed together with the other condiments.
Like any authentic Japanese restaurant, you could identify instantaneous the quality of its ingredients starting from the shoyu used and more importantly, the wasabi. At Fuku, the wasabi are freshly grated and you could taste the freshness, almost.

Yaki

 
One of the popular techniques in serving the fugu is to grill the marinated collar, with an added hint of salt to crisp the skin and also for additional taste of the sea. A simple pairing with sea salt made the delicate meat within the collar a whole lot more palatable.

Karaage

 
Nobody can ever resist a golden-brown crispy karaage, as portions of fugu were deep fried, giving that much desired crispness on the surface while retaining the juiciness of the flesh on the inside. The juxtaposition in textures between the batter and the flesh made this a clear favourite among the diners!

Tecchiri

 

 

 
After showcasing the various techniques of the chef, there was no better way than to enjoy a hotpot! The broth was prepared very simply with dashi water and a big slab of kelp. Many would be familiar with dashi, which commonly forms the base for miso soups. The fugu bones and assortment of vegetables were then added to the broth.
For those who enjoy their fugu cooked the right way, I would advise against putting it in together with the bones for that augmented the flavours of the broth. Cook the thickly sliced chunks of fugu as and when you are ready to have some in order not to waste the precious protein as leaving it in the broth for an extended period tends to make the flesh rather rubbery.
Zousui

 
There was no wastage to the essence of the broth as rice and egg were added to the rich and sweetened broth from the hotpot and left to simmer, forming a luscious and tasty porridge. Adding the specially imported shreds of seaweed, chives and vinegar, this is the usual staple to conclude an elaborate fugu spread.

Shirako

 
As we enjoyed the Tiger fugu, the filet mignon of puffer fish, it should not be neglected that its distinctive flavours come with its unparalleled concentration of toxins and the shirako is among the most potentially fatal parts of the infamously poisonous fish. Also known as the sperm sac, I was rather sceptical in trying it but curiosity got the better of me and I eventually took a portion, which to my pleasant surprise, was one of the finest delicacies tasted. With a rather elastic texture such as squid on the outer layer, the inside had a lightly mashy feeling which quite honestly one would form either a love or hate relationship though it went well on my palate as the acidity from the lime and salinity from the sea salt balanced the flavours harmoniously.

Hiresake

 

 
With Fuku importing some of the rare sake labels and top Shochu varieties not available anywhere else in Singapore, the Hiresake, which is a hot sake with the Tora fugu fin caught our attention. Apart from the theatrical display where it was set ablaze, there was a distinct taste and aroma to the sake which made it very easy to drink even for the ladies. The fin was specially sun-dried to remove any traces of blood before being grilled, charred and steeped in the hot sake. Infusing the gorgeous bold flavours from the sake into the fin, expect a robust punch of flavours as you crunch through the fin!

Sushi

 

 
While Fuku is a fugu centric Japanese restaurant, there are also non-fugu items such as grilled king crab and beef shabu-shabu. During our visit, the chefs had just launched a series of sushi platters and included uni (sea urchin) and different types of sword, fugu inclusive, of course.

 

 
There are three private tatami rooms which can seat up 8 to 10 persons with two of the rooms being connected by a movable sliding panel. Perfect for a private social gathering or even a dinner with business associates.

 
With a simple traditional Japanese setting decorated by wooden and bamboo features, stepping in for the first time gave a very comforting feeling with warm orange hues to set the atmosphere. Executive Chef, Koji-san (seen in the black uniform) would be at the front of the restaurant to greet his guests upon arrival.
To enjoy the prized fish surely does not come cheap with the kaiseki meals starting from S$150++/person but it was truly an experience and cuisine that would not be available anywhere else in Singapore or Asia for that matter apart from Japan itself. It was surely one of the more memorable meals I have had and given an occasion, I would return for an indulgent meal yet!

For original review, please visit us at http://www.makeyourcaloriescount.com/2014/11/sg-fuku-fine-fugu-kaiseki-1st-in-asia.html

 

 
 
Dining Offers: 試食活動


Other Ratings:
Taste
 4  |  
Environment
 4  |  
Service
 4  |  
Clean
 4  |  
Price
 3

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Categories : English | Café | Brunch

Quiet weekend brunch - a luxury you might say? Especially given the popular brunch culture now, it's almost hard or impossible to enjoy a meal without first having to queue even at the oddest hours. We were thus pleasantly surprised by this hidden gem in the vibrant estate of Keong Saik, hosting a cosy space for some relaxing weekend brunch time.
A catchy name that always gets a double take when it comes up in food talk, The Study was previously known as Keong Saik Snacks, with a revamp of its menu to include a different and wider variety of offerings. Serving good ol' British classics, it's part brainchild of Michelin Star Chef Jason Atherton, offering comfort food in an unpretentious setting.

Foie Gras Iberico Scotch Eggs ($17++)
with pickled beetroot, capers, honey mustard dressing

 
Greeted with a vibrance of colours bound to cheer up any meal, this was a good combination of textures from the soft wobbly yolk to the crisp outer layer paired with the crunch of pickled beetroot.

The Big English ($19++)
Three eggs, three slices of bacon, two cumberland sausages, grilled tomatoes, beans, toast, potato onion hash, sautéed mushroom

 
A sumptuous serving packed within, it was classic goodness done right. Fit to its name, it was indeed a very filling portion with interesting addition of potato onion hash and perfectly toasted bread to go with anything in this combination!

Coconut & Ricotta Pancakes ($19++)
with mango and mint salsa, lime creme fraiche

 
A fan of anything coconut-based, this was a must-order when I first saw it on the menu. I liked how the coconut fragrance came through strongly in every mouthful of the fluffy pancakes, well paired with the ricotta, lightly sweetened by the mango cubes.

Fried Salt and Pepper Squid ($17++)
with green chili, coriander and garlic mayo

 
An addictive starter that was well-marinated, I loved the chewiness of the baby squids that were crisp and good on its own. Pity that this was only available on its ala carte menu, that's served only when brunch isn't available.

Warm Vanilla Rice Pudding ($14++)
with mango sorbet, mint and mango dressing

 
A comforting warm bowl of creamy rice, it is one to be shared especially after a sumptuous meal like we had. With a strong mango flavour, I liked how it wasn't too sweet and the rice helped to add another dimension of texture to the dish.

Doughnuts ($15++)
with cinnamon sugar and caramel cream

 
If there's one thing that will bring me back to The Study, this would be it. I was never a fan of cream, but this was so light and fluffy that the first dip is a vicious cycle leading to an addictive pairing that drew me back repeatedly. An unassuming duo of cinnamon doughnuts, dipped into the caramel cream, a perfect sweet ending to any meal!

 

 
It's almost easy to miss it if you're not on the lookout, it's simply opposite Potato Head Folk, with a dark-tinted entrance to the cosy space. We loved the laid-back ambience that felt very homely and welcoming, with attentive service staff who'd been very prompt in responding to our requests and refilling of drinks. A comfortable space perfect for cosy gatherings, savour a relaxing meal within while the world passes by.

 
Complementing its studious counterpart, The Library, next door with the not-so-secretive speakeasy bar, it was interesting to see how the two were connected via an unassuming door and if you're there dining on a Friday/ Saturday evening, be pleasantly surprised by the unveiling of the secret hideout!

For original review, please refer to http://www.makeyourcaloriescount.com/2014/11/the-study-singapore.html
 
Table Wait Time: 0 minute(s)


Other Ratings:
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 4  |  
Environment
 5  |  
Service
 4  |  
Clean
 4  |  
Price
 4

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Flame of glory Smile Oct 27, 2014   
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Categories : French | Japanese

Bearing the tradition and spirit since the founding in 1969, renowned French-inspired Japanese patisserie Henri Charpentier recently opened its first overseas outlet at Dempsey Hill in Singapore. Named after a famous 19th century French chef, it was then founded by Naokuni Arita and started as a small cafe in the Hyogo prefecture in Japan.
Ashiya is the birthplace of the Henri Charpentier brand. Located in a suburb of the city of Kobe, it is the gateway to different cultures and the point of initiation for Modernism in Japan. The brand was born and raised in a place where quality and elegant products are valued and polished with a modern touch.
With more than 100 shops in department stores throughout Japan, Henri Charpentier Singapore makes a dedicated effort to incorporate locally-inspired desserts to add a varied dimension to the signatures it brings from Japan.
Can this dessert saloon spark the flames? Let us find out!

Rouge | S$19/++

 

While we struggled to choose our desserts among the various fanciful ones on the menu, the lady who took our orders took a separate menu which had pictures of the special desserts for our ease of choice. Fascinated by the artisanal display of the Rouge, it looked too beautiful to reject its presence.
It brought wows to the table when the dessert was served as the spectacular curves distracted us from the passion fruit and financier that laid the foundation. The parfait of marinated strawberries with a generous pool of strawberry sauce brought much tang while the acidity of the passion fruit cuts through our palate beautifully to leave a lasting impression. What set the dessert apart was the signature financier bake which delivered a palatable sweet almond after-taste.
Two almonds, Marcona and Fritz which are both rich in aroma are blended with original cultured butter from Hokkaido which allowed the lovely flavours to stand out despite the rather strong tastes of the strawberry marinade, While we continue our hunt for the best financier yet, this has to be the leading star for now.
Crepe Suzette | S$22/++

 

 

 

 
The orange-soaked crepes, flambéed in Grand Marnier instilled warmth and wonder with the first spoonful as the theatrical display of blue flames would set everyone in awe. Unfortunately, from where we were seated, rays of sunlight were shining directly which made the blue flames hardly visible to the naked eye. The layered crepe not only embodied the flavours of the alcohol but soaked up the luscious orange flavours to make it a sweet but not overly empowering dessert. Texture of the crepe was close to perfection as the soft layers were clearly defined and it was with great pleasure that I scoped up every single bit of the sauce and leaving nothing to clear on the plate!

Dome | S$29/++

 

 

 
Exclusively available only in Singapore, the chocolate sphere composed of a chocolate parfait of fraise d'amande and upon pouring down the alcohol which set ablaze a lightly visible blue flame (once again due to the bright sunlight shining through) that melted the chocolate casing. While the end result does not look the least bit palatable, it bore the richest flavours among the three desserts tried.
Blending the classic chocolate and strawberries combination, it packed a bag of flavours that would bring oomph to each spoonful of sinful calories!

 
The beautifully and lavishly decorated interior made the dining experience a lot more sophisticated than just a visit to any other dessert saloon. With a focus on 'creating a new appreciation for sweets', it could be seen that much efforts have been dedicated to enhancing diners' experience at Henri Charpentier.

 

 
The restaurant also has some outdoor seating available though it is quite apparent that no one takes such seating under the scorching afternoon heat!

 
Distinctly differentiated by its flamboyant pink carpet leading to the entrance, we felt that the overall experience at Henri Charpentier makes it a worthy visit albeit the relatively steep prices for desserts which can easily be justified by the quality of ingredients used and of course the theatrical display that would almost certainly impress your dining companions.
With a gorgeous ambience, the service crew were also commendable. Most of the service personnel were Japanese and while they left us to enjoy our desserts mostly, the manager took a special effort to strike up a casual conversation, asking about our experience and feedback of the various desserts tried. We were rather disappointed that we were unable to catch the display of blue flames for the two flaming desserts ordered but we are already planning our next visit in the evening to make sure we catch it during our next visit!

For original review, please visit http://www.makeyourcaloriescount.com/2014/10/sg-henri-charpentier-flame-of-glory.html
 
Recommended Dish(es):  Rouge | S$19/++,Crepe Suzette | S$22/++,Dome | S$29/++
 
Table Wait Time: 0 minute(s)


Spending per head: Approximately $28(Tea)

Other Ratings:
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Environment
 5  |  
Service
 4  |  
Clean
 4  |  
Price
 3

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