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mycc
This is mycc living in Central. I work in Central. I like to hang out in Chinatown, Raffles Place, Orchard. Japanese, Singaporean, Multi-Cuisine are my favorite cuisines. I also love Hawker Centre, Bakery and Roasted Meat, Desserts and Cakes, Dim Sum.
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Categories : Japanese | Ramen

For full review, please visit http://www.makeyourcaloriescount.com/2014/09/sg-chabuton-ramen-michelin-stars-that.html

While we are on the relentless search for the best ramen in Singapore, it is an undisputed statement that we think that among those tried thus far, we unanimously conclude that Sanpoutei offers one of the best offerings (if not the best) in town. Will the arrival of the award-winning Chabuton ramen claim the title trophy of the best ramen in Singapore?

 
Deemed the 'King of Ramen', Chabuton is the brainchild of Yasuji Morizumi, who started his career as a French chef in the 80s, drawing inspiration from the French and Italian fine dining restaurants in Japan. With a goal to consistently surprise and entertain his guests, he wanted to impart such elements into Japanese culinary which he felt was lacking at that point in time. Having established a successful career in French cuisine, Chef Yasuji wanted to explore the depth and complexities of ramen, reinventing the once fast-food dish into a speciality.
Having opened a restaurant, 'MIST' in Hong Kong, which won two Michelin stars in 2011 and 2012, it was the first ever Michelin star won by any ramen restaurant worldwide. Chef Yasuji went on to expand his restaurants outside Japan to Thailand and LA.

Junior Tonkotsu Ramen | S$8.30/++

 
What I really appreciated was that the ramens come in two different portions with the larger serving at S$11.90/++. Reputedly Chabuton's signature dish, the Tonkotsu Ramen has a rich and slightly creamy broth, resulting from hours of simmering pork bones. While the roasted white sesame seeds enhanced the flavours of the broth, it was too salty for our liking. With just one slice of the char siew resting atop the noodles, it would seem more value for money to go for the larger portion where you get three slices. The char siew was good with a nice marbling but there was nothing too spectacular to make us go wow.

Interestingly, there were containers of condiments at each table, of which, one contained deep-fried sliced shallots, a very Chinese touch to the ramen but one which added fragrance and crunch to the dish. Not the most traditional rendition when it comes to ramen but surely a positive twist.

Junior Shio Ramen with Kara Kara topping | S$8.30/++ with S$1 add-on

 
The kara kara topping which is the spicy minced pork was recommended as one of the house's favourites by the service crew. If you are a fan of ma-la (麻辣) dishes, then you would find this largely reminiscent of its flavours. Mildly spicy, this would suit the heat tolerance level for most people but personally, I found the taste to be out-of-sync with the rich savoury broth.

Junior Shoyu Ramen | S$8.30/++

 
With the best Shoyu Ramen tried in Singapore at Sanpoutei, we were excited to see if this could be the next contender. When this was served, we were surprised with the addition of bean sprouts which is not quite your conventional bowl of ramen. The soy-based broth was way too salty for our palate and lacked depth, resulting in a flat salty soup just to go with the noodles.

While the ramen was cooked al dente (diners are given the option to customise how they want their ramen), there was a subtle hint of that undesired starchy after-taste and smell (typical in those yellow noodles) which dragged the dish completely.

 
We also added the egg and pork belly slices at an additional S$3 as we were advised by the service staff that this would translate to greater savings for us!

Soft-boiled egg

 

When it comes to the eggs, there is nothing more important than consistency. As we ordered two sets of add-ons, we were able to draw comparison. While the first egg was cooked the way it should be, with that oozing yolk, the second egg was over-cooked which had a solidified yolk.

Kakuni, Square-simmered braised pork belly | S$6/++ for 2 slices (ala carte)

 

Although we had the kakuni as part of the add-on to our ramen, diners could choose to enjoy the dish as ala carte, which comes in two slices. What we loved was the clearly defined layers of lean and fatty meat in the beautiful pork belly cut. The flavours were well infused and while similar to our Chinese version of Dongpo pork, the Japanese version is lighter in sauce as it is typically simmered in dashi, soy sauce, mirin, sugar and sake. Simmered at a consistent low temperature, the collagen breaks down into gelatin, allowing the meat to remain moist. The leaner portions were however not tender enough to be cut through easily with a fork or spoon and tearing the square slice apart would strand the meat. A good version but not quite the best in our humble opinions.

Gyoza | S$5/++

 
We thought that all the sides were value for money and while the quality was not exceptional, it was decent. For this price, there were a total of eight gyozas and it was executed perfectly with the sides pan-fried to a lovely golden brown crispness which complemented the soft dumpling wrap. Do not expect the filling to be packed full though.

Ika Karaage | S$5/++

 
One could hardly go wrong with deep-fried dishes and this was no surprise. The sliced octopus came in sizeable portions, each coated with a thin layer of crisp batter. Resisting that golden-brown tan was futile as I popped two pieces in my mouth even before the shot was taken!

What we liked was that while the outer surface had a nice layer of crispiness, the octopus was cooked just nice, remaining tender and lightly elastic.

Tori Karaage | S$5/++

 

We did not realise until the dishes were served that our sides were not all that healthy, either pan-fried or deep-fried! The chunks of chicken had a nice layer of batter that was crisp and we really enjoyed the juiciness on the inside.

Overall, I thought that the customer service was good as the service crew was attentive and provided good advice in helping diners to get the best value from their food. When they noticed that our ramen were low on broth, they even volunteered to top up bowls with more soup. That extra effort taken surely left us with a positive impression.

 
Lightly decorated, it was appropriate for the casual-dining ramen ambience so expect some buzz and noise though we were fortunate enough to get a corner seat ensuring some quiet moments. With an abundance of ramen places in town, it might be sometime yet that we return to Chabuton given the rather disappointing ramens, not to mention there was a queue to beat.

 
 
Other Ratings:
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 2  |  
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 4  |  
Service
 4  |  
Clean
 4  |  
Price
 3

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Categories : Thai | Restaurant | Noodles

For full review and photos, please visit http://www.makeyourcaloriescount.com/2014/07/sg-khun-mee-thai-thai-chinese-street.html

Khun Mee Thai is one of the latest Thai casual dining restaurants to join the Singapore's F&B scene with a focus on Thai-Chinese street food. Using ingredients sourced directly from Thailand, Khun Mee Thai improvises its street food offerings by adjusting to the palate of Singaporeans.

Most people would be familiar with Thai cuisine but what exactly defines Thai-Chinese street food? Chinese immigraton was a major influence on the evolution of Thai street food, especially in Bangkok, where Chinese coolies worked hard to improve their lives. In their communal living, there was a demand for street-side stalls and typically noodle soups, rice dishes, snacks and sweets were popular offerings.

Can Khun Mee Thai bring the best of Bangkok street food to Singapore? Let us find out!

 
These soft rice paper wrappers are largely similar to the Vietnamese rice rolls as each roll is filled with Thai sausage, pan-roasted peanuts, Thai sweet basil and Thai long-leafed coriander. I enjoyed the thin rice wrappers which were not overly starchy and the Thai sweet basil brought a distinctively sweet licorice scent. There was a good variation in texture with the chopped roasted peanuts against the soft Thai sausage. To top it off, the homemade sweet, sour and spicy chilli sauce as an accompanying condiment helped to introduce some flavours to the dish but I found that the sweet and sour elements dominated and lacked any heat.

 
When the salad was served, I intuitively thought of the classic papaya salad but this was quite a different dish altogether. Mixed with glass noodles which were cooked al dente, the zesty chilli and lime dressing packed a bold punch of flavours. I liked that the heat in the dish was balanced by the mint and acidity of the lime which made it quite an addictive and appetising starter. The warm Thai sausage added a second dimension to the dish which was set by the contrasting textures from the chopped peanuts and greens.

 
Originated from Khun Aum's grandmother's recipe, the pork leg was carefully treated with a marinate time of at least two hours followed by four to six hours of braising. The sauce had that classic five-spice flavours which would be adored by some but quite personally I am not a huge fan. Nonetheless, the pork leg was cooked perfectly and was off-the-bone tender. Coupled with the layer of fats underneath the skin, it was almost melt in your mouth. While I enjoyed the beautifully cooked pork leg, the flavours of the five-spice did not quite work for my palate and I would have preferred a simple braise.

 
Dubbed as the signature dish of the restaurant, this Thai version to our commonly known wanton mee introduced some new elements such as the soft-boiled egg with that molten egg yolk. I found the portion to be quite sparing as each bowl had just about two to three thin slices of the char siew, an egg, three small pieces of dumplings with some greens. While the char siew carried a nice bronze colour from the marinade, the thin slices were barely sufficient to taste the juiciness of the fat in that prime choice of cut. I would have preferred a thicker slice to let the flavours carry through.

While the egg noodles were cooked al dente, the diners at the table all shared the same view that it was slightly too dry only did we later realise that we did not enjoy the dish the way it was meant to be served!

 
On each table is a row of condiments which include fish sauce, chilli powder, sugar and green chillies soaked in vinegar. Khun Aum later showed us how she intended her noodles to be served! She took a teaspoon each of the various condiments and added them into the noodles before tossing them to give a bowl of authentic Thai-Chinese Ba Mee.

 
It was quite different from the wanton mee that we grew up accustomed to as each mouthful had a lot going on in terms of flavours. There was the acidity from the vinegar and heat from the chillies only to be soothed by the sweetness from the sugar before an unami touch from the fish sauce. We highly recommend trying it the Khun Mee Thai way else it would have been quite pedestrian-tasting.

 
While we were told that the broth was simmered with large pork bones with coriander root, white radish and pepper for six to eight hours, it tasted quite muted in terms of flavours. The dumplings also needed more work as the filling was too little and it was a shame that I tasted more of the starchiness from the wrapping rather than the minced meat itself.

 
It was quite interesting to spot cauliflower in tom yam soup as that is not a common sight but the usual key ingredients such as prawns and mushrooms were present. One can have the option of having the tom yam soup with or without the noodles and may opt for it with or without milk. I preferred the clear soup slightly better as the flavours were bolder and distinctively sharper. While the acidity in the broth was accompanied by the heat and sweetness, I found it to be the dominant flavour which may please some but on this occasion it did not quite match my palate.
For those who prefer a milder taste, do opt for the tom yam with milk as that helped to neutralise the heat.

 
Another classic street food favourite, the green curry was mildly sweet and while I would have preferred it to be spicier and richer in flavours, this would suit those with a preference for more gentle flavours.

 
Being one of the popular bar snacks in Bangkok, these deep-fried battered chicken cartilages were something quite new for the diners at my table. While it was apparently not the most well-received dish, I actually enjoyed it a lot as the salt and pepper seasoning was spot on, balanced by that Thai sweet-chilli sauce. The crisp batter on the outside complemented the crunchy joints and if you do not know this already, each chicken only has two cartilages, one from each leg so many chickens sacrificed for this plate!

 
The fried rice was cooked with shrimp paste which brought out a rich unami flavour. It was accompanied by crispy dried shrimps, julienned green mango and omelette strips, Chinese sausage, sliced cucumber, shallots and chilli padi. While these individual ingredients were delicious, what brought the dish to harmony was the Thai sweet pork stew.

In order to best enjoy the dish, mix all the condiments together with the pork stew for a good contrast of textures and flavours such as the crunchy green mango to the crispy deep fried Chinese sausage.

 
The pandan-flavoured sticky rice brought back memories of our trip to Bangkok some half a year ago as this did not seem to be quite a common fare in Singapore. The succulent and naturally sweet mango specially imported from Thailand nailed the dessert with the fresh coconut cream which added richness. The sticky rice was cooked al dente with the desired level of sweetness. With the sticky rice served warm, it helped to elevate the fragrance of the infused pandan flavours.

 
Drawing comparison to the mango sticky rice, this looked a lot messier as the durian flesh and purée were not the most photogenic elements to portray. If you like good quality bitter-sweet durian, this would be something that you would want to end your meal with. Localised to suit the Singaporeans' palate, Khun Aum substituted Thai durians with Malaysian durians which typically have stronger flavours and fragrance.

 
Khun Mee Thai tries to provide authenticity of its Thai-Chinese dishes not only through the food they serve but also the ambience. With an open space casual and contemporary setting, with dark wood tables and benches decorated with Thai cushions, it reminded me of our experience at Nara Thai Bangkok. Every table has its own set of wooden cutlery box, with wooden chopsticks and stainless steel Chinese soup spoons. Overall, the casual dining experience was slightly above average with a focus on Thai-Chinese street food which would suit the palate of most locals.

Some hits and misses with the dishes but I felt that it was partly due to our misunderstanding of the convention and culture to truly enjoy the dishes. If in doubt, we would advise to check with the serving staffs to truly experience the tastes and flavours intended. For the price conscious, you would be most delighted to learn that the prices on the menu are nett prices so on hindsight, the food is really value for money!
 
Dining Offers: 試食活動


Other Ratings:
Taste
 3  |  
Environment
 4  |  
Service
 3  |  
Clean
 4  |  
Price
 4

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Good food with great service! Smile Aug 08, 2014   
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Categories : Multi-Cuisine | Café | Restaurant | Steaks and Grills | Burgers and Sandwiches | Brunch

Please visit us at http://www.makeyourcaloriescount.com/2014/07/sg-lokal-good-food-with-great-service.html for full review.

With raving reviews of Sarnies and having their head barista over at the still-pretty-new Lokal, we thought we had to give it a shot. Typically with disappointing food at cafes, this promised otherwise with one of their partners who was the founding chef of Tetsuya's in Sydney.

 
Despite being the new kid on the block, the people behind it have gotten themselves pretty popular with the snaking queues even as we reached at close to 2pm. I was personally impressed that despite the crowd, service hadn't been compromised and the dishes came up pretty quick.

 
A cheery start to any breakfast, we chose the fruits salad over poached pear for the variety in it. We loved the toasted granola that came with a solid crunch, perfectly paired with light yoghurt drizzled over and the mix of fruits for that slightly sweet touch.

Chunky Chips ($8)
(photo at the background)
While I'm a super fries fan, this was quite a disappointing one for me. I found it a tad too bland, and the accompanying dip didn't quite go with it.

 
This was a simple one done right. Perfectly toasted sandwiches with a good combination of smooth scrambled egg and light parmesan, with distinct mushroom taste that didn't overpower. Each ingredient played a good complement, simple comfort food great to go with any meal!

 
Well-marinated for a tender touch, it was a combination with caramelised onions for that pairing of savoury and sweet in one mouthful. The rye bread slice was a tad too dense that it got slightly messy trying to cut it up.

 
This was supposed to be served on panini but they'd ran out of it hence served on sourdough for ours. Refreshing with its lighter flavours and tender soft chicken shreds, a simple sandwich paired with the right crunchiness of the pancetta and sweet juicy tomatoes. We loved how it was simple looking, yet packed on textures and well-marinated. Great if you're looking for a light refreshing sandwich!

 
This was a winner with tender pork belly and evenly distributed omelette for that strong egg-y taste throughout. There was just a very subtle hint of chilli jam but overall taste was a hit with well-balanced flavours.

 
A pretty ordinary dish in my opinion, it was presented as what was described. Nothing spectacular but all nicely done, it was a simple dish for smoked fish lovers.

 
Desserts are the favourite course of our meal, and this was a promising one served with hokey pokey ice cream - vanilla ice cream with honeycomb toffee bits. I was expecting crunchy bits within for that added level of texture, though it turned out to be sticky bits. The ice cream was well-balanced in its sweetness, paired perfectly with the caramelized banana slices on top and a soft moist cake. It would have been even better if the cake was served slightly warmer for that contrast and softness.

 
This was a clear winner and we almost couldn't get enough of it! Okay, this isn't meant for sharing. Light and fluffy warm pudding with generous sauce drizzled on top, it was sheer indulgence yet balanced in sweetness so that you don't feel jelat (or overwhelmed). Paired with the good old vanilla ice cream, this was classic at its very best!

 
Coffee has always been a subjective one and this was a hit with me. I like how it was smooth and velvety with a robust flavour. There's also a choice of beans while you place orders and my friend, a serious coffee drinker liked the medium roast that was slightly heavier.

 
You know how some cafes simply do self-service or are lacking severely in service given how packed and understaffed they are? I was impressed by how they were still a full service cafe given the crowd, without any part of it being compromised. We had our tables cleaned up prior to our desserts served, and having their staff checking in on us from time to time on how we found the food. It made us feel that they actually do care about their customers' feedback despite how busy/popular they were, and added a nice touch to a satisfying meal.
 
Recommended Dish(es):  Sticky Date Pudding (S$12)
 
Other Ratings:
Taste
 4  |  
Environment
 4  |  
Service
 4  |  
Clean
 4  |  
Price
 4

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Rare gem found on Joo Chiat Road Smile Aug 08, 2014   
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Categories : Thai | Café

For full review, please visit us at http://www.makeyourcaloriescount.com/2014/08/sg-rochor-thai-rare-gem-found-on-joo.html

The casual dining scene in Singapore is almost as vibrant as the cafes with cuisines ranging from Thai to Korean. When diners like you and me are overwhelmed by the abundance of restaurants out there, it is honestly not easy to spot a rare gem anymore as most places succumb to shortcuts and compromise on serving the most authentic meal.

With much scepticism, we made our way down to this Thai bistro located on Joo Chiat Road. With no lack of famous eateries lined along Joo Chiat Road and the nearby East Coast Road, can this modest looking place serve a Thai cuisine that would make our calories worthy?

 
A classic appetiser, this papaya salad had the usual green papaya, carrots, long beans, garlic, chillies, dried shrimps and peanuts freshly pounded and blended with their in-house special tamarind sauce. What made it a touch more special was the sliced salted duck egg which added another dimension to the dish. In terms of flavours, it helped to provide the salinity balance to the tartness of the green papaya and the spice of the chillies before coming to a harmony with the sweetness and acidity from the tamarind sauce.

 
Available in two sizes, the larger portion is available at S$15.80, however this was more than enough to warm the stomachs of us three. With mild sweetness to tease our palate upon the first taste, the acidity grew with the sourness before the heat from the fiery red chillies took over. The portion was satisfying with succulent prawns, flower-cut squids and generous slices of fish fillet in the broth.

 
A huge fan of grilled pork collar, I have struggled to find a place where I can go to in Singapore for this comfort food. My best experience with this delicate piece of protein was at nahm in Bangkok where cooking was executed to perfection.

Grilled upon order, the pork collar retained moisture and tasted succulent as you bite into the juiciness of the melted fats. I loved the nice coating layer of crispness which was beautifully complemented by the heat from the chilli flakes, sourness from the tamarind, savouriness from the fish sauce, shallots and little palm sugar to enhance the flavours of the grill.

 
One of the signature dishes at Rochor Thai, it had an interesting story where a drunkard actually ate this flavourful dish that and woke up! What titillated my palate for this was the fragrance from the hot basil leaves and the red chillies. The portion size was surely generous but for most diners who would be more used to the crunch of your prawns, expect the texture to be tender soft. This might be due to it being slightly overcooked but on the positives, the prawns were thoughtfully deveined and deshelling was certainly made easy for diners.

 
Of the three types of basil, the chefs cleverly introduced a second type of basil, Thai sweet basil in this dish. Drawing resemblance from the usual tzechar stir-fry of the clams, the beautiful fragrance from the Thai sweet basil whetted my appetite. Be sure to scoop some of the lovely stock to go with the carefully cleaned clams as it adds a balanced flavour of savouriness and sweetness with a subtle hint of heat.

 
This had to be the dish of the evening with the chefs' brilliant use of technique to elevate the freshness of the fish. Quite frankly, I was surprised that a Thai bistro would implement the salt-baked technique which helped lock in the moisture to the flesh, resulting in a melt-in-your-mouth tenderness. Personally, I also find that fish should be cooked on-the-bone to derive the best flavours so this dish was really the star of the evening.

A generous amount of lemongrass was also stuffed into the fish supposedly to help enhance the fragrance but I thought it failed to shine through. Nonetheless, the dipping sauce helped to add some salinity to the already tasty protein.

 
More commonly know as kangkong, this stir-fry introduced some greens to complete a hearty meal. With fermented bean paste and chillies, the dish had sufficient wok-hei yet allowing the stems to retain their crunch.

 
There was a strong coconut fragrance in the sticky rice and served warm, it was truly some sweet calories to sum up a sumptuous Thai meal. The mung beans atop the thoughtfully designed heart-shaped sticky rice added a layer of texture with a nice crunch. The sweet Thai mango was also spot-on, overall a simple dish done well.

 
Offering a casual dining ambience, Rochor Thai offers honest cooking at very affordable prices. What really impressed me was dedication and quality of food served at this modest looking restaurant. If you know your Thai food, expect to enjoy a satisfying dish. That being said, we did not go for the usual street food such as Pad Thai or green curry but who needs those when you can enjoy perfectly grilled pork collar and salt-baked fish?

It was simply amazing to watch Joel in action as the chef took efforts to step out from the busy kitchen to speak to his customers and obtain their feedback. The serving crew on the floor were also fetching feedbacks and checking with the customers on their meals from time to time. While most would regard such dedicated customer service as a given, how often was your last meal at a bistro or restaurant that you received such attention?
 
Recommended Dish(es):  Pla Nin Pao Salt-baked Whole Tilapia with Seafood Dipping Sauce | S$22.80/++
 
Dining Offers: 試食活動


Other Ratings:
Taste
 4  |  
Environment
 3  |  
Service
 5  |  
Clean
 4  |  
Price
 4

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Categories : Italian | Middle Eastern/Mediterranean | European | Steaks and Grills | Kids-Friendly

For full review, please visit http://www.makeyourcaloriescount.com/2014/08/sg-burlamacco-ristorante-traditional.html

Quietly tucked among the conservation shophouses at Amoy Street, Burlamacco is a fine example of a stylish Italian eatery with its offering of a modern, elegant yet unpretentious environment. The friendly owner and Chef, Gabriele Piegaia wishes to juxtapose the lively ambience with his professional culinary skills honed from working in Michelin 1* restaurants in Italy, including Ristorante Antica Zecca and Ristorante Antica Osteria del Bai. Chef Gabriele then moved on to improve his skills working in New York, London, Syria and now Singapore. With a list of culinary awards and accolades under his belt, Gabriele works with a battery of suppliers around the world to ensure the freshest produce is brought to the table.

Tuscan-born Gabriele lives by the golden rule, "What you see on the menu is what you see on the plate". As such, Burlamacco's signature dishes are simple hearty fares. Can they make our calories count?
Suspended lampshades

Suspended lampshades

 
Incidentally, the iconic Burlamacco is a carnival mask from the characteristic town of Viareggio in Tuscany where one of the most famous Italian carnival is celebrated. Bearing a red, white and black carnival mask, the Burlamacco is an icon of vivacity and one cannot help but sense the vibe with the line of suspended lampshades that front the restaurant.

 
Like most Italian restaurants, Burlamacco serves some complimentary warm and fresh rolls baked in-house. With a nice crisp crust while remaining fluffy on the inside, it went well with the olive oil and balsamic vinegar dip served on the side.

 
This was a perfect summer dish with the vibrant colours of the tomatoes, oranges, sliced radish and fine beans complementing the tan of the octopus tentacles. If presentation was not enough to wow, the flavours and textures were spot on. The octopus tentacles had a nice crisp texture from the caramelisation formed on the surface though it was slightly rubbery on the inside. While most chefs would tenderise their octopus before service, apparently Gabriele intended the texture to be so to bring out the contrast.

In terms of flavours, the sweetness from the caramelisation of the balsamic vinegar coating the octopus tentacles were harmonized by the freshness of the tomatoes before a refreshing burst of tang from the orange pieces.

 
While most foie gras are served pan-seared, the Chef ingeniously introduced a layer of thin batter that crusted the delicate foie gras. The crispness of the golden-brown batter juxtaposes the melt-in-your-mouth foie gras, giving a much desired balance in texture.

When it comes to flavours, there was much complexity in the dish with sweetness from the balsamic vinegar reduction, caramelised onions and the luscious home-made green tomato chutney. It was perfectly balanced by the crunch from the pomegranate seeds together with its sweet-tart juices. For those with an umami palate, this dish would bring oomph but for those with a preference for a lighter fare, the sweetness from the accompaniments and the richness of the dish might tip the scales and overwhelm.

 
For those not familiar with beef tripe, it is the cow's stomach. Quite frankly, I am not a fan when it comes to innards but having told that this dish was regarded by I-S Magazine as one of the "50 things to eat before you die", it would seem only fair to give it a shot.

Much to our surprise, it was actually a really pleasant dish with the aroma of the melted Parmesan cheese whetting one's appetite before the chewiness of the beef tripe added a second dimension to the vegetable stew dominated by tomatoes. With more than 12 hours of cooking time before service, the richness and creaminess of the dish certainly made my dining partner swoon.

 
The Arrabbiata sauce is a classic Italian spicy sauce made from garlic, tomatoes and red chilli peppers cooked in olive oil. Arrabbiata literally means angry in Italian and owes the name to the heat of the chilli peppers. While the name of the dish and the colours looked intimidating, the heat would be a breeze for the palate of most Singaporeans.

With home-made pasta, you could taste the difference of the linguine compared to the commercially packed ones. Cooked al-dente, the flavours of that beautiful sauce were robust and when paired with that fresh Boston Lobster, this is easily a dish I call comfort food.

 
A simple dish executed perfectly, the beef short ribs were cooked sous vide for 48 hours at 62 degrees celsius to achieve this melt-in-your-mouth tenderness that was slightly pink and juicy. Precise temperature control and uniformity of temperature made possible with the sous vide preparation method ensures that the beef short ribs were evenly cooked.

The sauce was a careful reduction of Marsala wine where a sweet after taste lingers. While the potato mash and fine beans were good, they played complementing roles to the starred short ribs.

 
Playfully plated with summer colours, the panna cotta was beautifully done and easily one of the best I have tried. It set perfectly with a nice little wobble when you move the plate. The classic pudding-like dessert won us over with its creaminess and the flavours were elevated with the freshly scrapped vanilla pods.

It is quite impossible to go wrong pairing panna cotta with wild berries and this was simply the perfect ending to a very sumptuous lunch.

 
While all the dishes tried were executed to the highest level, what impressed us most was the dedicated customer service that Gabriele and his service team rendered to diners at each table. They took special efforts to speak to diners between service to make sure that the food was cooked to their liking and some intimate levels of interaction are no coincidence that most of the patrons are regulars.

 
Overall, the food was impressive and service immaculate. The ambience spots a rather relaxed setting yet elegant enough to host business lunches. With a wine cellar that carries in excess of 120 labels and conveniently located near the business district, Burlamacco would surely be a recommended place for an executive lunch or an intimate dinner date.

 
 
Recommended Dish(es):  48 hours slow cooked beef short ribs with Marsala wine sauce,Duck foie gras with caramelised onions and green tomato jam,Balsamic grilled octopus tentacles served with fine beans and orange,Linguine with Boston Lobster in spicy ''Arrabbiata'' sauce,'Pannacotta' eggless custard cream with vanilla bean and berries
 
Dining Offers: 試食活動


Other Ratings:
Taste
 5  |  
Environment
 5  |  
Service
 5  |  
Clean
 4  |  
Price
 5

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