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biba8169
This is biba8169 . I like to hang out in City Hall, Tanglin, Orchard. French, Italian, Japanese, American are my favorite cuisines. I also love Restaurant, Bakery, Café, cakes, muffins, strawberries, coffee.
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Categories : Australian / New Zealand | Fusion | Bars/Lounges | Seafood | Steaks and Grills

For a complete coverage, please visit:
http://www.epinosh.com/salt-grill-sky-bar-singapore/

 
Confronted by the capturing city skyline, I grew vulnerable at an instant. The breathtaking environ is uncontested, it is no wonder that others called it a romantic spot – I wouldn’t refuse such claim. I often get bewitched by the apparent horizon at BLU, I have thought that was the most friendly distance with the clouds until the restaurant was shut last June. While seeing people displaying their portraits taken against the limitless blue plane on various social media platforms, I have secretly bookmarked the place even when there’s nothing much to brag about on the food.

Located on the 56th floor at the iconic Ion shopping mall, one has to make his way to level 4 where he will be greeted by a Salt representative at the concierge counter before being transported to the restaurant in a private lift. Clad in stylish layout, pressed table cloth draping the well-aligned tables that sits under the tall ceiling, the space looks so accommodating. The sky bar adjoins Ion’s observatory deck will open at dinner time, sets the mood for some romantic engagement. Even if you don’t get to sit at the bar during the day, you could walk to the observatory deck for a 360degree view of the city landscape before getting yourself chained to the seat. The service staff are polite and sensitive to your needs. Undeniably knowledgeable on the food composite when I throw questions at her except a fair-skinned white macho who expressed disapproving frown when was told that the asparagus tasted weak under the strong blower in the restaurant.

 
The complimentary bread platter makes a great start off. Thick and pillowy, I was given both the raisins and the plain version. They came along with dipping olive oil, and another fanciful yet unique combination of almonds, brazilian nuts, cardamon, sesames, cinnamon spices that adds bites and depth to that fluffy slice.

 
I was nonetheless impressed with the Fig Tart but less with the crab omelette that many raved about. The brutal kind of tart that you must have, absolutely regrettable if you missed. Get ready to be charmed by that utmost thin and flaky puff pastry – resembles someone with bloated tummy, it was filled with airy compartments packed with overlapping pastry layers that was buttery and so brittle. The sweetness in the fig plus the caramelised onion adds sharp flavour to the puff, together with a smack drizzle of acidic verjuice. I liked the fact that they have been less generous with the blue cheese stuck between the figs and softened onions which may otherwise oust the celestial fit in the dish.

 
Most people will look for a robust egg dish that is almost always moist, tender yet with a sturdy structure. The Sydney crab omelette met the minimum – not overly cooked (though it could be better if it had been custardy) to hold up the hearty crab filling but taste flat. The spotless golden-yellow structure centred with simple embellishments was seen mediating in the miso broth with a zen outlook.

Not a must to opt for a side, but I chose the asparagus with confit eschallot. I couldn’t stressed this much that it looked as if it was a cold dish to me. Others might find the dish positive but it seems less conclusive for me. The crunchy stems were cold and although the shallot confit adds slight flavour, I leave the dish unconsidered.

 
For the mains, the char grilled corn fed baby chicken fared sumptuously. Endless enjoyment to bits!! Instead of rubbery skin, it turn out thin crisps, splotched by a wider char surface. I love its smokey flavour that scent the fork-tendered juicy meat. While I enjoyed the well-seasoned juvenile drumsticks, I am more fond of the moisture trapped within the succulent meat space! And if you have not eaten a cauliflower puree, this is the time. The whitish pool of creamy cooked texture was laced with some lemon notes which brings out its dedicate flavour. With less added dairy, the puree retained its light fresher taste.

 
Guaranteeing the best beef from the Northwest of Tasmania, Australia; the Cape Grim has a pronounced wild taste in the meat. Claiming the Australia’s finest hormone and GMO-free grass fed beef, it has been well sought after by top chefs world-widely. Going for medium rare preparation, the brownish exterior charred by flat iron encasing the pinkish marbled meat was somewhat appealing. The crust hasn’t had the satisfactory bite but the meat texture was tender with a bit of chew. Smudge each piece in the tangy yet pungent verde sauce with tons of flavours coming from chopped parsley, basil, capers and garlic, for very acute taste. Also, help yourself to the bulb-crisp frisée lettuce and remember to chow down the addictive fat chips that served alongside!

 
The greatest letdown was the Chocolate Soufflé which arrived with sheer dampness that I can’t live in contention. Yes, it was baked airy in a milder chocolate note but it was all WATERY in the centre, and right to the base!! It seems like alien to me and so I have to summon my genuine feedback when someone came forward to clear my table. With the first dessert being the lackluster, the second one that follows risked greater criticism which I hope not.

 
Of the Chocolate 3 Ways, the chocolate fondant cake has graced the dessert moment with lingering deep bitter flavour emitting from the moist cocoa sponge. The sweet-toothed wouldn’t fancy this but they may find the milk Mars bar a bit more attractive. Utterly sweet, surpassing the regular ones selling at the retail if not for the additional milk chocolate ganache topping the couverture. I have to agree that the treats have been made more luxurious under the Salt theorem, coming up with chunky almond bits coated in gooey soft caramel and premium milk chocolate to make it chic. Still, I wasn’t convinced to switch to a milk chocolate fan. The third was a puny scoop of milk chocolate ice-cream pat with oreo crumbles. Its exterior didn’t give clues to what was hidden until I spooned. I wasn’t told and so I thought it was meant to be a surprise. Like the fondant, this delights me though less captivating than the first since it has been sweeter. But anything that comes with Oreo cookies is pleasurable, I thought. These desserts didn’t quite complete my meal, less memorable. So, if I were to encode anything from Salt, it has to be the splendid horizon plus the entrée.
 
Recommended Dish(es):  Fig Tart,Char Grilled corn-fed baby chicken
 
Other Ratings:
Taste
 3  |  
Environment
 4  |  
Service
 3  |  
Clean
 3  |  
Price
 3

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Categories : Spanish | Restaurant | Paella | Fine Dining

For a complete coverage, please visit: http://www.epinosh.com/catalunya-singapore/

 
A luminous capsule designed by AvroKO is set afloat the waters of Marina Bay, bestowed panoramic cityscape, so very impressive. The backdrops during the day and night time are so arresting, better yet, you could climb to the observation deck – opened to public access – for more incredible 360 degree views. This, Catalunya is proud to call it home!

 
This much-anticipated Spanish restaurant & tapas bar has enlisted a class of graduates from the now-defunct El Bulli; from Home Economics stream – chef Alain Devahive Tolosa, Hospitality faculty - restaurant manager Pol Perello and other talented ones include Ruben Carmona, Mauricio and Sergi Villacampa. As well as award winner of Bacardi Superior Rum Legacy Cocktail Competition 2011, mixologist Dario Nocentini to work on your cocktails. With such a high quality culinary/service team, I should set them on micro appraisal and yes, together with the dishes offered.

A major part of the Restaurant menu seems to offer homey Catalonia (North-East region in Spain) cooking with a modernistic few to reminisce the passé of El Bulli. The former inarguably interests me more and straight away signalled the wait staff to summon 3 tapas, 1 paella, a dessert and not forgetting one that claimed the best all-around mojito – Gaudi’s Mojito.

 
Not all Cuban high-ball taste the same, quite dependent on the skills of the mixologist. Gaudi’s surely has an extra zing to it, the reason that the original concoction now has added orange, a touch of chocolate (mozart), cava (Catalonia sparkling wine) and Anejo 7 years (aged Cuban rum). I wouldn’t considered that a prime mixer but positively potent and refreshing. Good try for a $22!

 
The small-size oblong croquettes showed up on our table within a quick 15 minutes. A pack of 4, stacked haphazardly in a mini “deep-fryer” tray looks tantalising. These few tasted better than those we have tried in other bars, the ultra creamy potato texture though a bit harsh with the béchamel sauce that caused it runny, still this is the key element that captured my vote. The exterior, wrapped in golden breadcrumbs was notably crunchy while the Jamón ibérico ham bits simply revitalised the earthy flavour in the creamed mash. Worthy try for another $15 (the price has increased when compared with the current menu on its website).

 
Next presented was the Chorizo Y Estrellados. The word “Estrellados” simply means fried egg in Spanish. Here, I am seeing a pool of smashed fried eggs sitting atop some diced potato with slices of deep red chorizo draping the eggs. Very traditional and unpretentious, one that has a down-to-earth flavour. I like the way the paprika in the chorizo smudged the potato to a red hue as it goes along and giving it a tiny bit of smokey peppery kick aftertaste with an added saltiness in it. I wish I had emptied everything but I realised I had too much carbs in my meals. Slightly on the high side for $18.

 
While everyone chose to have a whole suckling pig, I am less ambitious to stomach. Instead, I went for a tapas serving just like any gals gathering dinner. Excessively crisp skinned, this cube of roasted swine has a pronounced deep flavour, slightly gamey but acceptable. Be sure to dabble some lemon puree in each bite, it helps to mask the strong taste in the meat. Less fibrous, the meat was moist and the texture resembled some pulled pork. Not extremely remarkable but I did love the crispiness in the skin and its nice roasted scent. Perhaps I will invite a larger group of people the next round for a whole swine, and skip the tapas that cost $22.

 
The most wonderful main dish – Lobster Rice has arrived. I have swap this for my initial crispy paella which is a tapas and my attempt has proven right. Slightly wet and more fanciful than the conventional version especially when it comes with a grilled half-Lobster. Intensely flavourful, the short grains were cooked slightly al dente and each looking plump after soaking up all the good extract from the peppers and squid bits (“U won”, he said – my guess was right upon checking with those guys – the morsels were squids) in the fish broth. The lobster meat was very fresh and succulent. The charred flavour coating the lobster was unforgettable. One of the highly sought after in the menu although the smaller quantity with a tag of $80 sounds unbelievable.

 
The Spaniard talked me into having the Torrija which I obediently say YES. The highlight of my meal! Less charming at first sight, but it has a very seductive taste!! The caramelised exterior, somewhat torched and superficially scorched with a curdy middle. Slightly honeyed in the milk composite that soaked the thick toast but was too addictive to share out. Together with the smokey drizzles on the ice cream that serves alongside, I don’t know what can be better. To price it at $14, I am more than happy to ask for 2 servings! I guess I am an avid sweet-toothed.
 
Recommended Dish(es):  Torrija,Croquettes,Lobster Rice
 
Spending per head: Approximately $130(Lunch)

Other Ratings:
Taste
 4  |  
Environment
 5  |  
Service
 5  |  
Clean
 4  |  
Price
 4

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Categories : French | Hotel | High Tea | Brunch

For a complete review, please visit: http://www.epinosh.com/brasserie-les-saveurs-reload-singapore/ chopstick

I have reviewed a few times since and yes, they are consistent with top-notch service - almost unbeatable. Let me share with you their dinner menu which I think it has been less covered here.

 
All my meal attempts at Brasserie Les Saveurs were pleasant – nothing screwed up – but not utterly out of this world. Believe it or not, this is the only restaurant proved to be a cut above the rest in the 6-star rated tavern, with Yan Ting being the runner up. But it makes me wonder what infallible strategies the business have employed to make it sustainable in the long run when I see a fading crowd, the dining room barely filled with 15 guests on a Saturday evening. Strong bottom line or just keeping afloat, either way, it should least worry me, as long as they still served me quality food with exceptional service. Yes, their Maître d‘ is expecting my arrival and receives me cordially.

 
I was here for a round of dinner, a birthday celebration sort with a group. The idea of sitting right in front of the Live band sounds groovy but turned out ill-considered. I will relate why as it goes along.

 
The opening ceremony wasn’t at full blast but one that’s solemn. Arrived in pairs, the wait staff sent messages from the Chef of Cuisine – Alexandre Lozachmeur, who aims to amuse us and that was why it has been called the “Amuse Bouche“. I didn’t need this to understand his culinary intention, obviously this is French classics with a modern touch. Lovely duck confit, slowed cooked to yield a tender (not meltingly) texture and then meticulously tear into humble strips to feed the guests. Sits atop a bed of lentils evenly dressed in light vinaigrette, the duck meat shines in the dark and becomes a bit more stimulating with chives decor.

 
Well, the messengers have left us quite a while, giving us room to handle the mouth amuser and avoid eavesdropping behind the partition. But I know we were been observed from a distance, that was how they were described as “discreet & attentive”! I hope our laughter didn’t radiate the whole dining room and thanks to the Live music, our serious conversation turned into a few moments of chuckle, then ventured into some senseless jokes when we interpret each other wrongly – because we were muffling away as the band plays in the background. So, my end-of-day conclusion was right – I made a bad judgement, I chose the wrong table but it was fun, anyway. We turned silent when we noticed the messengers were back in the hall. Marching towards us, this time, they delivered the Terrine de Foie Gras.

Being popular and well-liked, this duck foie gras came to me in a terrine form. I took a few twinkles before slather a part of it on my brioche toast. Undeniably good, very rich and buttery. I am not a fan of this “fat-liver” species, as I find the force-feeding breeding technique disturbing and so I could only consumed a portion of it. I know most people cannot resist its delicate taste and although this is a duck version, it was less gamey and melting, not losing its shine when placed side by side with those goose cousins. The braised figs are not to be missed. They were cushy, naturally sweet with a sharp sourish note fathered by the balsamic vinegar decked within the salad, very refreshing.

 
Then the soup arrived. It seems the chef is getting a little impatient, sending us his new message more quickly by now. Never mind about the pace, I could stop them when appropriate. Watching them drowning the pancetta in my plate with that creamy Chestnut Veloute was so tantalizing. The engagement was rhythmic with chestnut bits, then bacon fragments, followed by the smooth and velvety chestnut creme whirling in my mouth – sensational. I have always loved the veloute here, either the pumpkins or spinach, they were all good. The volume was kept reasonable, hence it wouldn’t weigh you down. But some in my group did find it slightly too creamy, so its up to one’s tolerance.

 
This braised short rib is prime! Every one agreed that this is the key catalyst to the night’s event. Unbelievably dissolved in the mouth, I have changed my mind to like this over the Coq au vin at db Bistro (I know its a different breed but the french classic way). The beef burgundy at Antoinette was considered good by the group until they were greeted by this esteemed Plat de Côte. The well-marbled beef cut has been braised in red wine, producing an ultra-tender; barely visible texture that rewards me with mouthful of rich winery flavour. The potato purée smeared in part with tapenade sauce was buttery and smooth, not too complex but very heart-warming. The modern beef cube was truly a refined piece, I was completed sold.

 

 
At last, the chef has send us his love note. His 2-piece poetry appears romantic and impressive. The Hazenut ice-cream was chocolatey, not overly sweet though I’d prefer some good bitter ones. It’s tactical and trying hard to pair up the two, but none was psychoactive. Not entirely weak, at least that slab of milk chocolate mass was worth remembering for its caramel taste highlighted with a hint of salt that average out the otherwise cloying feel. And the lusty segment was gently carpeted by a praline sable which was made sandy and mimics the taste of a shortbread but faint. This masterpiece was striving hard to win me over but I was not attracted by it, sadly. Not complaining but this Chocolat au Lait et Noisettes was anemic among the rest.
 
Other Ratings:
Taste
 4  |  
Environment
 5  |  
Service
 5  |  
Clean
 5  |  
Price
 4

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Categories : Japanese

Flavouring aside, perhaps one has a greater desire for a tantalising texture in pursuit of attaining an exceptional meal experience. Any good piece of meat is capable of cropping up a challenging time, from the moment of selection, preparation to cooking. But all things cannot be achieved without a sophisticated rearing process in the case of swine production, especially when the legendary Iberian pig becomes the spotlight and well sought after by the culinary kitchen. If there are 2 things I should encode in my memory for 2012, it will be “Tapas” and “Iberico pork”. The two are often spotted on the dance floor, if not seen on the stove top. Almost synonymous, they are nearly everywhere you see in the dining room.

 

 
You probably have sank your teeth upteem times, tearing the meat effortlessly that follows by a lardy smooth melty sensation in the mouth with this prized meat - bathed in hot oil. While others had them at some popular Japanese eateries, I tried mine at Tonkichi – a Tonkatsu specialty chain – under the Pokka Food Corp.

 

 
In the month of December, the breaded Iberico tenderloin makes it to the menu for the first time –
[VDO:7]
. Priced at $32, I received 3 fillet cuts, each half the size of my palm. Given a choice of hire (tenderloin) and rōsu (loin) cut, I often opt for the former as it came with lesser amount of fats and most delicate. In fact, the meat runs along the central spine of the pig, with the loin muscle making a larger part for locomotion and a much smaller segment merely for posture then becomes less fibrous – tenderloin, found near the end of this loin. Make your choice over hire or rōsu, either part of this Iberian pig will serve alongside with some refillable shredded cabbage & rice, tsukemono (pickles), chawanmushi, miso and fruits.

 

 

 
I fought hard to resist its buttery texture, these golden crisp fillets weren’t floury. I am always amazed by the Japanese batter, so well formulated that it shatters every time. Aren’t you tempted by the craggy exterior when confronted? I succumbed to this swine tyrant uncontrollably, too weak to defend. Although the crumbs can be edgy and caused some discomfort when met with parts of my soft oral linings, the moisture kept in the fillet under the crisp sheath soothed the pricks I had. What makes it marvellous was the less greasy and ultra-tender composition. This acorn-fed Spanish black pork is definitely worth trying. The additional 10bucks is the price to pay for the premium specimen, 50% for that regular hire katsu set going for $20.90. Be sure to dabble the meat in Worcestershire sauce, better yet, coat them in the powdered sesame seeds you crushed earlier on. The caramelised condiment adds a fruity punch to the meat. Unless you wanted more heat, the yellow karashi (Japanese mustard-paste) will be helpful. For simplicity, squeeze the lemon wedge for that extra zest and to fuse any additional oily secretion – if any – but wasn’t present in my case.

I guess the meat is the only item I have greatly enjoyed, other than the good mannered service and a timber wood layout. Although I questioned on the quality of the rice which was mushy, the worst being the fruits – watermelon – all time syrupy in its unnatural form.
 
Recommended Dish(es):  Iberico Pork Hire/Rōsu Katsu Set
 
Spending per head: Approximately $32(Dinner)

Other Ratings:
Taste
 4  |  
Environment
 4  |  
Service
 4  |  
Clean
 4  |  
Price
 4

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Categories : French | Bakery | Café | Desserts and Cakes

For a complete coverage, please visit:
http://www.epinosh.com/paul-maison-de-qualite-1889-ii-singapore/

 
It coincides with my recent met up with J, when they just launched their new menu. I didn’t expect that I could taste a new set of dishes until it has been announced publicly. Though I am not convinced that it would delight me the way my mum’s version with Pandan, but I am more than happy to give it chance, if not to find out how well they have execute the science of Guestology especially after all the bad reviews by many.

They have been drawing big crowds since the day they opened, which I have never doubt. Despite the lapsed in service, I am still seeing people making beeline at its entrance after peak hours. The main dining hall was bustling with high tea enthusiasts – conversations echoing the room. J suggested we take one of the tables outside the restaurant for a quieter time, much to what I agreed. We managed to get one with the help of a waiter – polite (checked). Without spilt seconds, another waiter came with 2 sets of menu and giving us ample time to decide (checked).

 
I hold the menu in my hand with great anticipation. Unmistakably, it was given a face-lift with a range of newer creation – still the French classics but now, some with a local twist. New faces includes specialty sandwiches: Pan Bagnat Club (S$16.90); open sandwiches: Salade Crevettes Mangue (S$19.90), Croque Truffade (S$19.90) – a simple toast topped with cheddar cheese, Béchamel sauce, truffles & mushrooms which most suits anyone with a less complicated desire. Then comes the Haute dishes: Hachis Parmentier (S$23.90) - a dish of minced beef/chicken mixed in buttery pureed potatoes and tossed with onions & herbs. The kitchen spent laborious hours on the dish, peeling each hot boiled & roasted potatoes by hand and mashed. You probably may wish to try this high level dish the next time you visit Paul, it looks comforting though less elaborated.

This time, a young lady dropped by to see if we are ready to order which I requested she check on us after a minute which she did so accordingly (checked). During the wait for the meal, glasses of water are served and refilled automatically (checked).

 

 
I am most curious to examine this new open sandwich to see if it is capable of spicing up my day. Having learned that the concoction took the team months to perfect, I am hoping that it passed the mark remarkably. Served with a handful of crisp seasonal side greens, this Tartine Poulet Curry (S$17.90) comes with a unique flavor rarely seen in a French bistro. Making a bold change to the regular Poulet Citron in the previous menu; this one has a nice but mild spicy marination. Though I find the coarsely chopped chicken meat a bit chewy and dry, the spices did distract my attention from the less attractive bird. The curry jelled quite well with the cheddar along with the crunchy diced zucchini and tomato, of which, the mass emits a strong and lingering flavor in each mouthful. Overall, the combination is a success for its balanced flavor, without a fierce domination. I was told that it has been well-received by many non-locals for its subtle curry taste. While it tasted good, I feel that the Campagne bread needs less toasting time, to avoid having a hard and edgy crust that bruised my gums. If you ever spotted me tearing – the underlying cause is not the curry, sure thing. But what warms me, is the hospitality that comes from the heart. This has never occurred nor I heard from others who have dined at Paul in the past, but today, I am having waitress coming up to me, asking if the food tastes good (checked).

 
J was seen enjoying the Pan Bagnat Niçoise (S$16.90) – a specialty sandwich made with Pain de Mie bread using tuna mayonnaise topped with rings of red onion, tomatoes and piling up high with fresh salad leaves and slices of boiled eggs. The burger appeared in its clean defining look, not a messy setup like a drenched American version. Accordingly, it pleases J who is won over by its fresh texture and natural taste, less obscuring. We selfishly eat our own dish, each singing in approval. We have nothing to complain about, if anything, it has to be the dessert.

 
Prominently pictured under the dessert section, I refused to flip the page, trying to nail down one Pandan treats. J gave a good laugh and left me with the decision rights. Should I point to my left or allow it to swift to the right, my eye ball swinging in pendulum. I had wanted a Pandan eclair but wish badly for the Pandan Millefeuille. J saved me from that ripping agony, chose the French puff pastry on my behalf. In less 5 minute, the Napoleon dessert arrived. My first impression – terrified. I felt intimidated by its unnatural green hue, the icing fondant has been awkwardly fabricated – simply a vanilla glaze. It left me wondering if the dish descriptions in the newspaper are reported correctly – the recipe has a Pandan-infused paste? Erm, we didn’t taste any Pandan flavor throughout, but a stronger gula melaka (palm sugar) custard cream, much to our enjoyment. I liked the puff pastry for its light, crumbly texture though not ultra flaky and stacked up with a thick layer of creamy paste in the middle. The cream is smooth but slightly over-candied and a bit weighed down. Unless you are a fan of gula melaka (palm sugar) treats, the Millefeuille Fraises will be a much better choice.

 
Undeniably, Paul never failed to charm the crowd with its traditional French cooking when they kept returning for those mouth-watering pies and pretty sweet patisseries. Its hard not to take a second look at them in the bakery window while making my takeaways. It is encouraging to note that for a business that spans 9 generations in history is accepting the notion that palate changes with time and cook closely with trend. With the big improvement in the overall service standard (I have “checked” many applaudable service point), I am sure they will win back some grouchy customers who had abandoned the brand after their first maiden try. I hope the service level will be this good in the new outlet at Ocean Financial Centre (Collyer Quay) which is slated to open in 2013, Q1. There and then, I would entrust myself to them whenever I needed a quick french meal.
 
Recommended Dish(es):  Chicken Poulet Curry
 
Spending per head: Approximately $25(Lunch)

Other Ratings:
Taste
 3  |  
Environment
 3  |  
Service
 4  |  
Clean
 3  |  
Price
 3

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